The Working Closet

where life meets style

brain drain

I’ve been trying to write a coherent post for…ooh, a while now. But you know what? It’s not going to happen. Instead, I’m just going to empty the contents of my brain into the blog. You’re welcome.

#getdressedGoodbye, scones. I’ve been having some stomach issues (I will spare you the details — again, you’re welcome!) and after trying everything else I could think of, I stopped eating wheat, and lo and behold, no more stomach issues! I’m not going gluten free, because my god there’s gluten in EVERYTHING and I am too lazy to do my research, but I’m skipping all the things that I know are wheat based. Which means most of the things I love. Like carbohydrates. Wah. I’m basically replacing wheat with quinoa, which is totally working for me — my favorite thing so far is quinoa fajitas. I just pile all the fajita fixings on top of the quinoa. Easy! And delicious. Yum.

Pixie Pants FTW! I’m completely obsessed with my J. Crew Pixie pants; I’ve bought two pairs in the past month, in black and navy. On sale, both times! With no shipping charge! Go me. Rachel recommended them last year (I think her exact words were something like, “THESE ARE THE BEST PANTS EVER”) and she was exactly right. They’re really a fairly substantial legging, as opposed to a traditional trouser, but damn they’re comfy. I would wear them every day if I could. Instead, I’m wearing them pretty much every other day.

Run like the wiiiiiind! I’m running the Williams Route 66 Marathon half in 26 days. Which means that in 25 days, Rita and I will be hopping on the Kilpatrick Turnpike and heading to Tulsa for our third annual Half-Assed Girls Getaway™. Last year, we picked up my race registration, ate dinner at 4 pm and were in bed at 7:30. Best Saturday night ever (but a pretty lame girls’ weekend). ((Whatever, we won’t have our kids with us, so it’s a win! Woo!))

90 days, max. I’m seeing a new therapist; I love her and would like to have her live in my closet because good lord I need a lot of therapy. Last week and in the course of telling her about a specific thing that was worrying me, I started spinning out my fear that one of my children (who shall remain nameless) will still be living in my game room when he’s 30 because he cannot manage money and OMG I’m going to have to pay his rent FOREVER GAH. And she said, “Wait, wait, STOP. Don’t do that. Don’t worry about anything that’s more than three months away. Ok?” Best thing anyone has ever said to me.

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19 comments on “brain drain

  1. eep
    October 29, 2013

    First of all, that 90 day thing just knocked me on my heels. It is going to take a while for me to process that.

    Now, about those Pixie pants. I have the idea that you are tallish. I am 5’10” and often buy tall pants as my inseam is 31.5. Are the pants that won’t allow for a cuff? Should I buy the regular knowing that I will be showing ankle?

    • Susan
      October 30, 2013

      I’m 5’6″ but my legs are short, so I opted for the shorter length in the Pixie pants and they fit perfectly. I would suggest that you grab a pair of pants that are the length you want these to be and measure the inseam, then order the pair with the inseam that is closest to that. Mine hit right at the ankle bone, which is exactly what I wanted.

  2. Linda Grier
    October 29, 2013

    I like your therapist’s 90 day rule and plan to apply it liberally. Another one that helps me when I am worrying is to ask myself “what is the basis for that?” If it is solely flowering from my own brain and has no external basis whatsoever, as is often the case, I resolutely put it aside and refuse to worry about it. Or try to at least.

  3. Shannon
    October 29, 2013

    LOL, too funny about your therapist’s response. Of course she’s right. In other news, how weird is it that about 2-3 weeks ago I also gave up (most) wheat/carbs?? (Not carbs like the carbs in fruit or carrots or crazy things like that, more like all bread products and things like crackers, muffins, tortillas, etc.) I wasn’t having tummy troubles so much as an inability to lose a pesky 5 lbs., a constant craving for junk food, fatigue and crankiness, and an annoying belly pooch that wouldn’t go away. I cut out carbs in desperation and have been AMAZED at how truly easy it has been. (OK, I have slipped up a couple of days and gorged on chocolate or cookies, but for the most part, it’s surprisingly easy.) I pretty much just eat protein in place of carbs, and still eat my usual fruits/veggies. I feel way less sleepy during the day, I lost a few lbs. immediately and effortlessly, and I just feel better overall. I did this after reading the book “Wheat Belly,” did you read it too? Anyway….weird coincidence. Sorry to go on so long.

  4. Gina
    October 29, 2013

    Always love to read your writing Susan. Very interesting about the wheat/carbs. What do you eat for breakfast? I’d like to try this as I’ve been having some stomach issues lately too. I know there are plenty of things that don’t have carbs but I’m a cereal & oatmeal person so just curious…

    • Susan
      October 30, 2013

      I’ve been trying not to give up carbs, since I’m still running so much, just wheat. And breakfast foods are my favorite, no matter what time it is. I’ve been eating a lot of steel cut oatmeal (made in the slow cooker — so easy and so delicious). There are gluten-free steel cut oats out there, but I’m just eating the regular Quaker variety. I also eat a lot of Chex cereal (rice and cinnamon and chocolate) and Greek yoghurt with fruit and cinnamon. I’m being more cautious about scones and muffins and toast (which I LOVE, sadly) and I’m skipping my normal afternoon snack of crackers or pretzels and eating almonds or tortilla chips and humus instead.

      And I really really miss the scones. A LOT. Just for the record.

      • Gina
        October 30, 2013

        I would too..

    • AlisonC
      October 30, 2013

      Hi Gina,
      My stomach issues were caused by dairy (or more specifically lactose) I now use lactose free milk and feel so much better. I was also very fatigued and just generally felt ugh but did not realise that until I started to feel better as it had been happening of ryears.

      • Gina
        October 30, 2013

        Thank you. I have that general ugh feeling…maybe it’s not just age as my doctor tells me…

  5. Torry
    October 29, 2013

    My cousin had to go gluten free and she is able to eat corn tortillas. Some people can eat oatmeal if it is processed in a gluten free factory. There are gluten free rice krispies. Also, rice chex and corn chex are gluten free. We have eaten a lot of spring rolls lately when we go out together.

    About the 90 day plan, not worrying about things that are in the future is so hard for me! I fight the worry by reminding myself of all the things I worried about that never happened. The classic one: I also worried that my son would never be able to support himself, much less a family. He pulled himself together and has a job that pays better than any his college-educated parents ever had!

  6. Claire @ My Devising
    October 29, 2013

    LOVE the 3 month thing!

  7. Caroline
    October 29, 2013

    If you can afford a therapist for your first world problems (Its called LIFE) then you have had a very cushy life. Seriously……

    • Kelly
      October 30, 2013

      Wow. Someone has their panties in a wad today.

      I’ve been thinking of seeing a therapist myself lately. But I’m have an international move in 4 months (causes me worry)… and think it may be better to start when I am back in the USA. I think I would like to have someone unbiased to help me sort my thoughts. Are my expectations realistic, what should I try to control and what to let go? What shall I do with my life and how can I be happy?

      I’m glad to hear that you are having a great experience. Give me hope.

      • Stacy
        November 4, 2013

        Kelly–You might be able to see a therapist for a short term. She may give you some techniques to take with you on your overseas trip. That way you’ll have a coping mechanism. You could take up with her again when you return. I practice some low level meditation and practice yoga three times a week. You can do that anywhere! Anything to keep the worries at bay.

        Yes, worries and therapists can be a first world problem, but it is a problem and we need to be able to live our lives as well as possible if we can.

    • Shannon
      October 30, 2013

      Wow, mean comment. I wonder if that sort of meanness is really necessary. Sure, life is full of problems we all have to deal with, but isn’t that exactly why compassion and kindness are so important–because we ALL struggle at times, we’re all human beings, and life isn’t easy 100% of the time for anyone, “first world” or not? Also–if you care–lots of therapists work for sliding-scale fees, at non-profit agencies targeting low-income clients, and/or accept health insurance benefits that require only a (generally small) co-pay; I’m a therapist and I’ve done all three at various times in my career.

      • Shannon
        October 30, 2013

        (Note: I was replying to Caroline, above–not Kelly. Hope that was clear.)

    • Susan
      October 30, 2013

      Hi, Caroline,

      With all due respect, please be cautious about judging another person for seeking therapy. Mental health care is deeply stigmatized in our culture, largely because of assumptions like the ones you have put forth here. To assert that any mental health issue is frivolous (which is what I assume you mean by your reference to my “first world problems”) undermines the whole notion that our emotional health is as important as our physical health. We don’t deny that a patient diagnosed with cancer or diabetes requires the care of a specialized physician; mental health issues need to be seen in the same light, as medical issues, and treated accordingly.

      And yes, my family is financially stable (which, again, is what I assume you mean by my “very cushy life”) and I am deeply thankful for that, because it has enabled me to get the help we need at this point in our life. But the fact that I can afford to see a mental health professional doesn’t negate my need for therapy; being well-off is not a guarantee that life will be perfect. The fact that the option to pursue therapy is often tied to larger financial considerations simply highlights the fact that we still treat mental health care as a privilege rather than a basic medical necessity.

      Finally, Caroline, until you walk a mile in my shoes — or those of anyone who is dealing with mental health issues, of any sort — please keep your criticisms to yourself. Some day, you may need the support of the people you are lashing out at now.

      Best,

      Susan

  8. Jamie
    October 30, 2013

    Wow on the 90 day thing. I am going to do my best to put that into practice now. Going through a divorce after 25 years together, lots of woe-is-me-pity-party-of-one going on here. Thanks, Susan!

  9. stella tinglin-webb
    October 30, 2013

    Love your blog, Susan. Always makes me think, chuckle and covet a new clothing item. Totally with you on your letter to ‘Caroline’ and have learned over the years that although others may seem as though they have perfect lives, this is almost never the case. Thank god for good therapy!

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